Archive for the ‘Social Media’ category

Recap – August Event

August 22, 2011

Missed creative director of Warschawski Thomas Neuberger‘s presentation on Social Media & the Integrated Marketing Campaign? Here’s just a quick sampling of what he had to say…

  • Traditional and digital communications are all tools in your toolbox.  Social media is just one of these important tools. Be sure to keep this in perspective when planning your campaign.
  • The secret to using all your tools (traditional & digital) is brand clarity.
  • Brand, marketing and public relations opportunities all focus on your primary, secondary, and tertiary target audiences. As the cycle repeats itself, you continue to strengthen the power of your brand. This is integration in action!
  •  The text book definition of a brand is the “expectation of someone or something that delivers a certain feeling.” This expectation is created through communication and reinforced (or weakened) by the experience.  What Thomas wanted us to understand is that ultimately “Brand is about making a fundamental emotional connection with your audience.”
  • Seventy percent of all brand-based decisions are made at the emotional or subconscious level. Great branding inspires loyalty beyond reason. Examples: Dunkin Donuts coffee, McDonald’s coffee and Starbucks.
  • Brand is not about the logo, collateral material, packaging, tagline, advertising – these support the brand.
  • Main questions to ask: What does your company want to make people feel or think about themselves? How do you want to stand out? How do you want to be remembered?
  • Companies who have gotten it right – TOMS Shoes, Southwest and Levis. We also talked about one big “Uh-Oh” involving social media: the 2009 Skittles Twitter campaign. For a time, Skittles lost control of its brand when it turned its home page into a Twitter page resulting in tweets having nothing to do with the colorful candy  (If you’re unaware of the case, Google it.).
  • Some statistics: 43% of peer to news sharing comes from social media. 27% of frequent sharers generate 87% of all news shared online. It’s this 27% that can become your brand champions/ambassadors.
  • Most of all, social media isn’t a one-sided conversation. It is about developing a connection with your target audience.  Don’t use social media as just another platform. Use it to start a conversation.

The program ended with a great Q&A where we discussed other campaigns successes, as well as a few failures. Thanks again to Thomas Neuberger of Warschawski’s for sharing the morning with us.

Want to hear more about this and other relevant PR topics? Mark your calendars for the 2011 Mid-Atlantic Chesapeake Conference scheduled for November 3, 2011. This year’s event titled The New Face of PR will be co-hosted by the Maryland, National Capital, and Central Chesapeake Chapters. Registration & details coming soon at www.prsamd.org.

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Invitation to Join Google+

August 3, 2011

I was recently invited by Melanie Trudeau at Jaffe PR to join Google+. Since it is still in beta and you need an invitation to join, I gladly accepted. Although I haven’t spent a lot of time on the site, the profile was very easy to set up. If you are interested in creating a profile, email me at khughes@milesstockbridge.com and I will send you an invitation to join.

KiaraHughes is a Communications Specialist at Miles & Stockbridge P.C. She is also a member of the Communications Committee, Public Relations Society of America (PRSA), Maryland
Chapter.

Opinions and conclusions in this post are solely those of the author unless otherwise indicated. The author has provided the links referenced above for information purposes only and by doing so, does not adopt or incorporate the contents.

Google+. Thoughts?

June 30, 2011

Google has launched it’s answer to Facebook, Google+.

Have you tried it yet? What do you think?

Be a part of the 34th Annual Mid-Atlantic Chesapeake (Chessie) Conference —literally!

May 10, 2011

This year, our theme is The New Face of PR: strategizing connectivity, innovation, and integration. 

This year’s event will include sessions that talk about how to strategize, innovate, and integrate social media tools to create a successful communications program that leverages the connectivity of social and traditional media. 

Help us create the image of the new face of PR!  Send us your social media profile photos (i.e. Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, et al) to info@prsamd.org, and we will include them in a beautiful mosaic that will be on our “save the date” postcard as well as all other conference materials. 

How exciting would it be to pick out your profile photo in PRSA-MD conference materials?  Which one do you choose — Twitter, LinkedIn, or Facebook?  It’s your choice, but don’t delay — make sure you’re a part of the event!  Send your profile pic to info@prsamd.org by Friday May 27. 

Speakers: if you’d like to present on these topics (i.e. measurement, integration, the 24/7 news cycle, strategic planning, and more) at Chessie, we’d love to hear from you.  Send your profile pic and your RFP to info@prsamd.org by Friday May 27! 

Still to come: more exciting information about this year’s conference.  Stay tuned!

Social Media: 214 Million Results, But Do You Have The Answers You Need?

April 8, 2011

If you Google the term “social media,” you will get approximately 214 million results. Even if you enter a more specific search term like “social media resources,” you still get approximately 57 million results.

Q: How can we quickly and easily determine which of the sites within these searches are both useful and accurate?

A: You ask the people who live and breathe social media every day.

Are you actively using social media? If so, what resources would you recommend to fellow PRSA members? There is no right or wrong answer. However, chances are if you found it helpful in the past, it may be helpful to someone else in the future.

Take a look at this site and let me know what you think. Don’t forget to post your list of recommended resources.

The Social Media Examiner, a “free online magazine designed to help businesses discover how to best use social media tools like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn to find leads, increase sales and generate brand awareness.” Signing up for the Free Subscription allows you to receive posts via email. After signing up, click on Getting Started for helpful social media resources.

Kiara Hughes is a Communications Specialist at Miles & Stockbridge P.C. She is also a member of the Communications Committee, Public Relations Society of America (PRSA), Maryland Chapter.

Opinions and conclusions in this post are solely those of the author unless otherwise indicated. The author has provided the links referenced above for information purposes only and by doing so, does not adopt or incorporate the contents.

Four Tips on Social Media Crisis Communications

October 28, 2010

This post was written by Laura Crovo, SVP, Public Relations Director of MGH
http://mghus.com
http://mghus.com/blog
http://facebook.com/mghus

 Earlier this year, a survey from German consultancy Gartner Communications found that while nearly 85% of companies worldwide have general crisis plans in place, only 20.7% have social media crisis plans set. Moreover, a staggering 78.6% of in-house communicators said they were pretty unprepared or so-so when it comes to social media crises.

What this shows is that more and more brands are embracing the importance of social media marketing, without adequately preparing for the risks. This isn’t to say that brands shouldn’t be jumping headfirst into Facebook, Twitter and the like – they just need to treat them as they would any other communications avenue by making sure they are ready to tackle any challenges.

Several major brands have been dinged via social media recently – whether it was due to a product deficiency, customer service problem or employee transgression. But, what’s added insult to injury in many of these crisis situations are slow, inadequate and insincere responses to the calamities at hand – probably due in large part to a lack of social media crisis preparedness.

So, what should brands do?

  • Stop looking at “general crisis communications” and “social media crisis communications” as two different things. When planning for catastrophes, you need to think about all possible implications – including media coverage, internal dissent, social media furor and upset stakeholders. Whether it’s sending an email to your staff, responding to a reporter’s questions or posting to your Facebook page, all of these tactics need to be treated as equally vital in the communications process. 
     
  • Be prepared before hitting the launch button for the Facebook page. This is a critical part of the social media process. Brainstorm all of the possible critiques or problems, and develop potential responses or messaging so you don’t waste precious time that could escalate a social media snafu. For instance, if your business is a restaurant, be prepared to deal with claims that your food stinks, your servers are rude, your prices are outrageous, and your daily special gave someone food poisoning.
     
  • Pay attention – all of the time – to what people are saying about your company and where they are saying it. Even if you don’t have a Facebook page, brands need to understand that there’s always a chance that people will talk about you online. Each comment needs to be evaluated individually to determine whether, how and when you should respond. There are no hard and fast rules, but generally speaking, you should be transparent, gracious and accountable (as appropriate).
  • Respond in a prompt manner. The world of social media moves much faster than traditional communications, and any lag can just serve to fuel the fire. Similar to how you would respond to a media query in traditional PR, it’s important to quickly address issues on the web, even if only to let you your consumers know that you are taking the issue seriously and looking into resolving it.

PR and social media are not mutually exclusive – and this could not be more evident than when it comes to crisis communications. Companies must take the time now to develop plans to handle situations whether in traditional or social media platforms, or else they could be found on the wrong side of a really angry and vocal Facebook contingent.

Congratulations 2010 Best in MD Awards Winners: Your Hard Work Has Paid Off

July 6, 2010

This year, the 2010 Best in MD Awards was held as a luncheon as part of the 2010 Chessie Awards.  There were many excellent entries, but the entries from the awards winners truly stood out from the pack.  They deserve all the accolades they received, and we again heartily congratulate all of the winners.  Your hard work has paid off! 

Here are the highlights of the afternoon: 

2010 Best in Show
Maryland Lottery for American Classics 

2010 Best Representation Theme Award
Crosby Marketing For PANDORA’s Introduction

2010 Lifetime Achievement Award
Gene Bracken

2010 New Professional Award
Bridget Forney 

We also have a complete listing of 2010 Best in MD Awards winners on prsamd.org.