Archive for the ‘Twitter’ category

Personal Invite to the 2012 PRSA Mid-Atlantic District Conference

November 1, 2012

Greetings!

I’d like to personally invite you to this conference on Thursday November 8 at the BWI Four Points Sheraton. You really should come. Why? Because!

(1) You need to keep your skills sharp – Learn the latest in PR/Communication’s best practices from other DC, MD, VA pros!

(2) You love to get the inside scoop on hot industry trends and techniques!

(3) You miss catching up with colleagues you haven’t seen in awhile – Don’t miss our Happy Hour Networking Event afterwards…enjoy cocktails, see what your colleagues have been up to, make new contacts!

NEW for this year, choose from three different tracks: (1) Social Media (2) Business/Leadership (3) PR Essentials. Mix and match. No matter what career level you are in, there is something for everyone at this conference!

And, just FYI, tickets are selling pretty fast this year because we’ve got such a great lineup of speakers and topics. Don’t let someone else take your spot! Space is limited.

Register Now: http://www.prsamd.org/news/events2012/nov12-program.htm

See you there!

Nneka Jenkins
2012 Mid-Atlantic District Chesapeake Conference
Planning Committee Chair

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Missed the PRSA International Conference? No Worries—Another Conference Awaits!

October 22, 2012

by Jackie Allder, Chessie Planning Committee

So, did you make it to the PRSA International Conference last week?  I would loved to have attended this year’s event in San Francisco, but my schedule didn’t work out (and I’m not sure my budget could’ve handled the cross-country trip either).  Although PRSA’s International Conference is over, there’s still a chance to hear tips, tricks, and PR’s best practices from pros in the industry this year. 

On November 8, the Maryland Chapter is partnering with several other Mid-Atlantic District chapters (National Capital Chapter, Central Pennsylvania Chapter, Central Chesapeake Chapter, and the Blue Ridge Chapter) to host the Mid-Atlantic District Chesapeake Conference (also known as Chessie). 

New for this year’s conference is three tracks to choose from — Strategic Business and Leadership, PR Essentials, and Social Media — and more than a dozen local members are presenting on everything from creating a strategic communications plan to networking effectively.

For example, you can join Barbara Haupt and Elissa Leif of MiniMatters for a discussion about the wild world of web videos, or find out how to manage the client/agency relationship with Robert Udowitz and Steve Drake of RFP Associates.

You’ll  also hear from members Rachel DiCaro Metscher, Erica Pierson, Sabrina Kidwai, Margie Newman, Veronica Brown, Amy Lestition, Rebecca Andersen, APR, Dana Vickers Shelley, and Tiffany Thomas Smith, among many others. 

Additionally, #Chessie12 features keynote speaker Amy S. Mitchell from the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. And because this year’s event is sponsored by chapters around the region, it’s a great opportunity to network with PRSA peers you might not see that often, especially during the post-conference happy hour. 

So #Chessie12 has a dozen sessions, an awesome keynote speaker, and a networking happy hour.  It’s local (hosted at the Four Points Sheraton BWI in Baltimore, MD) and costs less than $200 to attend if you’re a PRSA member and you register by November 1.  

Don’t let this one pass you by…visit http://www.prsamd.org/news/events2012/nov12.htm, download the program, and register today!

PRSA-MD’s Meet the Media Event

June 6, 2012
PRSA-MD June 2012 Event - Meet the Media

PRSA-MD June 2012 Event – Meet the Media

PRSA-MD’s Meet the Media Event was a success thanks to our moderator Bill Atkinson from Weber Shandwick, and panelists (shown from left to right: David London (What Weekly – @WhatWeekly), Katherine Gorman (WYPR – @kgorman), Danny Jacobs (The Daily Record –  @TDRDanny), Laura Smitherman (The Baltimore Sun – @lsmitherman), and Chris Daley (Maroon PR – @ChrisDaley43). 

There was lively discussion all around as panelists shared their insights on how to best leverage traditional media in the Social Media Age.  For the most part, all said they use social media to engage readers, encourage sharing, and drive traffic.  Some of the takeaways on how to formulate and build relationships with journalists are:

(1) Personalize Communications: Instead of just pitching via e-mail blasts, phone them (or leave a quick voicemail) to draw their attention to a story idea; make sure your story idea is the best possible fit with the beat/subject areas they are covering.  Don’t use the generic words “PRESS RELEASE” in the subject line — it’ll get ignored instantly!

(2) Treat journalists like real people.  If you’ve met or worked together before, remind them in the message so they’ll have a point of reference for who you are.  This goes a long way — especially if you’ve previously helped them out in a pinch. 

(3) Take it to the next level!  PR pros that get the best results have deep relationships with the journalists they assist.  There are many ways to raise your profile.  One suggestion made was to take reporters out to lunch.  Keep in touch by sending them a “how are you” message every once in awhile (e.g. holiday card).

The biggest lesson here is to focus on personalized, “high touch” communication and phase out or minimize the mass communication approach.  The more, the better!

Be a part of the 34th Annual Mid-Atlantic Chesapeake (Chessie) Conference —literally!

May 10, 2011

This year, our theme is The New Face of PR: strategizing connectivity, innovation, and integration. 

This year’s event will include sessions that talk about how to strategize, innovate, and integrate social media tools to create a successful communications program that leverages the connectivity of social and traditional media. 

Help us create the image of the new face of PR!  Send us your social media profile photos (i.e. Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, et al) to info@prsamd.org, and we will include them in a beautiful mosaic that will be on our “save the date” postcard as well as all other conference materials. 

How exciting would it be to pick out your profile photo in PRSA-MD conference materials?  Which one do you choose — Twitter, LinkedIn, or Facebook?  It’s your choice, but don’t delay — make sure you’re a part of the event!  Send your profile pic to info@prsamd.org by Friday May 27. 

Speakers: if you’d like to present on these topics (i.e. measurement, integration, the 24/7 news cycle, strategic planning, and more) at Chessie, we’d love to hear from you.  Send your profile pic and your RFP to info@prsamd.org by Friday May 27! 

Still to come: more exciting information about this year’s conference.  Stay tuned!

Twitter is Posting Ads on Our Individual Streams

November 11, 2010

Starting on November 1, Twitter began posting ads on individual users’ Twitter streams. While Promotional Tweets at the topf of searches have been available, the new Twitter stream ad would appear in a user’s Twitter stream regardless of whether they follow that advertiser or search for anything on Twitter. Ads will be places based on who the users follower (both people and products).  Initially, these ads will be rolled out only to those users of HootSuite.

What do you think? Do you see the ads as an invasion?

Four Tips on Social Media Crisis Communications

October 28, 2010

This post was written by Laura Crovo, SVP, Public Relations Director of MGH
http://mghus.com
http://mghus.com/blog
http://facebook.com/mghus

 Earlier this year, a survey from German consultancy Gartner Communications found that while nearly 85% of companies worldwide have general crisis plans in place, only 20.7% have social media crisis plans set. Moreover, a staggering 78.6% of in-house communicators said they were pretty unprepared or so-so when it comes to social media crises.

What this shows is that more and more brands are embracing the importance of social media marketing, without adequately preparing for the risks. This isn’t to say that brands shouldn’t be jumping headfirst into Facebook, Twitter and the like – they just need to treat them as they would any other communications avenue by making sure they are ready to tackle any challenges.

Several major brands have been dinged via social media recently – whether it was due to a product deficiency, customer service problem or employee transgression. But, what’s added insult to injury in many of these crisis situations are slow, inadequate and insincere responses to the calamities at hand – probably due in large part to a lack of social media crisis preparedness.

So, what should brands do?

  • Stop looking at “general crisis communications” and “social media crisis communications” as two different things. When planning for catastrophes, you need to think about all possible implications – including media coverage, internal dissent, social media furor and upset stakeholders. Whether it’s sending an email to your staff, responding to a reporter’s questions or posting to your Facebook page, all of these tactics need to be treated as equally vital in the communications process. 
     
  • Be prepared before hitting the launch button for the Facebook page. This is a critical part of the social media process. Brainstorm all of the possible critiques or problems, and develop potential responses or messaging so you don’t waste precious time that could escalate a social media snafu. For instance, if your business is a restaurant, be prepared to deal with claims that your food stinks, your servers are rude, your prices are outrageous, and your daily special gave someone food poisoning.
     
  • Pay attention – all of the time – to what people are saying about your company and where they are saying it. Even if you don’t have a Facebook page, brands need to understand that there’s always a chance that people will talk about you online. Each comment needs to be evaluated individually to determine whether, how and when you should respond. There are no hard and fast rules, but generally speaking, you should be transparent, gracious and accountable (as appropriate).
  • Respond in a prompt manner. The world of social media moves much faster than traditional communications, and any lag can just serve to fuel the fire. Similar to how you would respond to a media query in traditional PR, it’s important to quickly address issues on the web, even if only to let you your consumers know that you are taking the issue seriously and looking into resolving it.

PR and social media are not mutually exclusive – and this could not be more evident than when it comes to crisis communications. Companies must take the time now to develop plans to handle situations whether in traditional or social media platforms, or else they could be found on the wrong side of a really angry and vocal Facebook contingent.

#NewTwitter

September 28, 2010

 Have you tried the New Twitter? While it’s slated to become active as a preview over the next several weeks, you are able to toggle between the two versions until the New Twitter becomes, well, Twitter.

What does the New Twitter have that Old Twitter doesn’t? The list includes @mentions, retweets, searches, and lists above your timeline on the left of the screen, and Twitter partnerships with DailyBooth, DeviantART, Etsy, Flickr, Justin.TV, Kickstarter, Kiva, Photozou, Plixi, Twitgoo, TwitPic, TwitVid, USTREAM, Vimeo, yfrog and YouTube that allow you to embed photos and videos.

In addition, additional info is shown when you click a Tweet, including @replies, other Tweets by that same user and a map of where a geotagged Tweet was sent from. Plus, a mini profile pops up when you click a @username so you don’t have to navigate away from the page.

Here’s what people have to say:

What do you have to say? Are you looking forward to the #NewTwitter?