Posted tagged ‘Speaker’

Missed the PRSA International Conference? No Worries—Another Conference Awaits!

October 22, 2012

by Jackie Allder, Chessie Planning Committee

So, did you make it to the PRSA International Conference last week?  I would loved to have attended this year’s event in San Francisco, but my schedule didn’t work out (and I’m not sure my budget could’ve handled the cross-country trip either).  Although PRSA’s International Conference is over, there’s still a chance to hear tips, tricks, and PR’s best practices from pros in the industry this year. 

On November 8, the Maryland Chapter is partnering with several other Mid-Atlantic District chapters (National Capital Chapter, Central Pennsylvania Chapter, Central Chesapeake Chapter, and the Blue Ridge Chapter) to host the Mid-Atlantic District Chesapeake Conference (also known as Chessie). 

New for this year’s conference is three tracks to choose from — Strategic Business and Leadership, PR Essentials, and Social Media — and more than a dozen local members are presenting on everything from creating a strategic communications plan to networking effectively.

For example, you can join Barbara Haupt and Elissa Leif of MiniMatters for a discussion about the wild world of web videos, or find out how to manage the client/agency relationship with Robert Udowitz and Steve Drake of RFP Associates.

You’ll  also hear from members Rachel DiCaro Metscher, Erica Pierson, Sabrina Kidwai, Margie Newman, Veronica Brown, Amy Lestition, Rebecca Andersen, APR, Dana Vickers Shelley, and Tiffany Thomas Smith, among many others. 

Additionally, #Chessie12 features keynote speaker Amy S. Mitchell from the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. And because this year’s event is sponsored by chapters around the region, it’s a great opportunity to network with PRSA peers you might not see that often, especially during the post-conference happy hour. 

So #Chessie12 has a dozen sessions, an awesome keynote speaker, and a networking happy hour.  It’s local (hosted at the Four Points Sheraton BWI in Baltimore, MD) and costs less than $200 to attend if you’re a PRSA member and you register by November 1.  

Don’t let this one pass you by…visit http://www.prsamd.org/news/events2012/nov12.htm, download the program, and register today!

Tips for Dealing with the Changing PR Landscape

January 22, 2010

Planning for PR programs in 2010 will be more difficult than in past years because of the dynamic and continually changing PR landscape.

frankstrong

Choose one: (a) strongly disagree, (b) disagree, (c) unsure, (d) agree, (e) strongly agree. Fifty percent of public relations professionals surveyed chose (e) agree, according to Frank Strong, public relations director for Vocus. Strong addressed PRSA-MD members Thursday morning at the University of Baltimore (left), where he discussed some of the factors that make PR planning increasingly difficult, and what you can do about it. Here are a few of my takeaways.

Maintain your media relationships. Last year 293 newspapers folded, 1,226 magazines disappeared, 10,000 radio employees were cut, and 100 TV stations were affected by Chapter 11. In short, massive job loss. Where are all these editors and reporters going? Some of them are getting into PR, but many are going to online publications. Wherever they move, they’ll land somewhere and may continue to be relevant contacts. So don’t let your relationships go. You never know where a sacked reporter might resurface.

Master SEO and other new media tools. Attention is the new deficit, and social media can help break the threshold. Increasingly, PR professionals are giving testimonials about how their blog or tweet or discussion board made a difference for their organization or a client. It’s not just about the message anymore. We need to think beyond text, giving more consideration to  posting videos, engaging readers in conversation, tagging and, above all, SEO. Figure out which social media tools are appropriate for your organization—and learn how to use them. (Note: SEO is a must for every professional communicator’s toolbox!)

Learn crisis communications. You’ll need it. Up until now, the prevailing wisdom has been that crisis communications should be left to specialists. While this may still hold true for major crises, it’s also true that social media leaves everyone exposed to previously nonexistent dangers. Know how to respond when a customer or employee launches a withering attack at your organization or its leadership. You may not be able to control it, but you need to know how to deal with it, or better yet—prevent it.

Integrate your communications. Social media’s rejection of commercialization makes PR central to an organization’s communications efforts. Users can sniff out marketing copy, but a good PR professional knows how to connect to people with authenticity—in other words, without selling. Okay, so does a good marketer, but relationships are the essence of PR. It’s not worth considering which of these two functions is more important. They’re both important for many organizations. A better question to ask is, How can PR and marketing work together?

For more information on this topic, check out Frank Strong’s whitepaper, Meeting Change: Public Relations Planning in 2010.