Posted tagged ‘Twitter’

Personal Invite to the 2012 PRSA Mid-Atlantic District Conference

November 1, 2012

Greetings!

I’d like to personally invite you to this conference on Thursday November 8 at the BWI Four Points Sheraton. You really should come. Why? Because!

(1) You need to keep your skills sharp – Learn the latest in PR/Communication’s best practices from other DC, MD, VA pros!

(2) You love to get the inside scoop on hot industry trends and techniques!

(3) You miss catching up with colleagues you haven’t seen in awhile – Don’t miss our Happy Hour Networking Event afterwards…enjoy cocktails, see what your colleagues have been up to, make new contacts!

NEW for this year, choose from three different tracks: (1) Social Media (2) Business/Leadership (3) PR Essentials. Mix and match. No matter what career level you are in, there is something for everyone at this conference!

And, just FYI, tickets are selling pretty fast this year because we’ve got such a great lineup of speakers and topics. Don’t let someone else take your spot! Space is limited.

Register Now: http://www.prsamd.org/news/events2012/nov12-program.htm

See you there!

Nneka Jenkins
2012 Mid-Atlantic District Chesapeake Conference
Planning Committee Chair

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PRSA-MD’s Meet the Media Event

June 6, 2012
PRSA-MD June 2012 Event - Meet the Media

PRSA-MD June 2012 Event – Meet the Media

PRSA-MD’s Meet the Media Event was a success thanks to our moderator Bill Atkinson from Weber Shandwick, and panelists (shown from left to right: David London (What Weekly – @WhatWeekly), Katherine Gorman (WYPR – @kgorman), Danny Jacobs (The Daily Record –  @TDRDanny), Laura Smitherman (The Baltimore Sun – @lsmitherman), and Chris Daley (Maroon PR – @ChrisDaley43). 

There was lively discussion all around as panelists shared their insights on how to best leverage traditional media in the Social Media Age.  For the most part, all said they use social media to engage readers, encourage sharing, and drive traffic.  Some of the takeaways on how to formulate and build relationships with journalists are:

(1) Personalize Communications: Instead of just pitching via e-mail blasts, phone them (or leave a quick voicemail) to draw their attention to a story idea; make sure your story idea is the best possible fit with the beat/subject areas they are covering.  Don’t use the generic words “PRESS RELEASE” in the subject line — it’ll get ignored instantly!

(2) Treat journalists like real people.  If you’ve met or worked together before, remind them in the message so they’ll have a point of reference for who you are.  This goes a long way — especially if you’ve previously helped them out in a pinch. 

(3) Take it to the next level!  PR pros that get the best results have deep relationships with the journalists they assist.  There are many ways to raise your profile.  One suggestion made was to take reporters out to lunch.  Keep in touch by sending them a “how are you” message every once in awhile (e.g. holiday card).

The biggest lesson here is to focus on personalized, “high touch” communication and phase out or minimize the mass communication approach.  The more, the better!

Four Tips on Social Media Crisis Communications

October 28, 2010

This post was written by Laura Crovo, SVP, Public Relations Director of MGH
http://mghus.com
http://mghus.com/blog
http://facebook.com/mghus

 Earlier this year, a survey from German consultancy Gartner Communications found that while nearly 85% of companies worldwide have general crisis plans in place, only 20.7% have social media crisis plans set. Moreover, a staggering 78.6% of in-house communicators said they were pretty unprepared or so-so when it comes to social media crises.

What this shows is that more and more brands are embracing the importance of social media marketing, without adequately preparing for the risks. This isn’t to say that brands shouldn’t be jumping headfirst into Facebook, Twitter and the like – they just need to treat them as they would any other communications avenue by making sure they are ready to tackle any challenges.

Several major brands have been dinged via social media recently – whether it was due to a product deficiency, customer service problem or employee transgression. But, what’s added insult to injury in many of these crisis situations are slow, inadequate and insincere responses to the calamities at hand – probably due in large part to a lack of social media crisis preparedness.

So, what should brands do?

  • Stop looking at “general crisis communications” and “social media crisis communications” as two different things. When planning for catastrophes, you need to think about all possible implications – including media coverage, internal dissent, social media furor and upset stakeholders. Whether it’s sending an email to your staff, responding to a reporter’s questions or posting to your Facebook page, all of these tactics need to be treated as equally vital in the communications process. 
     
  • Be prepared before hitting the launch button for the Facebook page. This is a critical part of the social media process. Brainstorm all of the possible critiques or problems, and develop potential responses or messaging so you don’t waste precious time that could escalate a social media snafu. For instance, if your business is a restaurant, be prepared to deal with claims that your food stinks, your servers are rude, your prices are outrageous, and your daily special gave someone food poisoning.
     
  • Pay attention – all of the time – to what people are saying about your company and where they are saying it. Even if you don’t have a Facebook page, brands need to understand that there’s always a chance that people will talk about you online. Each comment needs to be evaluated individually to determine whether, how and when you should respond. There are no hard and fast rules, but generally speaking, you should be transparent, gracious and accountable (as appropriate).
  • Respond in a prompt manner. The world of social media moves much faster than traditional communications, and any lag can just serve to fuel the fire. Similar to how you would respond to a media query in traditional PR, it’s important to quickly address issues on the web, even if only to let you your consumers know that you are taking the issue seriously and looking into resolving it.

PR and social media are not mutually exclusive – and this could not be more evident than when it comes to crisis communications. Companies must take the time now to develop plans to handle situations whether in traditional or social media platforms, or else they could be found on the wrong side of a really angry and vocal Facebook contingent.

Have you registered yet? You won’t want to miss…

June 10, 2010

If you haven’t registered to attend the 33rd Annual PRSA-Maryland Annual Chesapeake Conference, now is the time. This event boasts a dazzling array of speakers who will bestow many gems of wisdom you can use to sharpen your skills as a professional communicator. Here’s a taste of what’s to come:

Writing for the web and social media

Marci DeVries, owner of MDV Interactive, and David Harrison, owner of Harrison Communications, will lead an interactive session on writing for new media. Writing for new media is different than writing for traditional media. Learn the secrets to writing compelling content for Twitter, Facebook, blogs, pitches, and more.  Discover how and why messages spread virally on social media platforms and gain an overview of how people are consuming news and information via the web. This information-packed session will give you ready-to-use tips to help raise your message above the information clutter.

Visit Marci DeVries’ website at www.mdvinteractive.com.

Visit David Harrison’s website at www.harrisoncommunications.net.

Register here to see David Harrison & Marci Devries speak

Social media law 101:  A legal perspective for communicators

Bradley S. Shear, ESQ., managing partner and founder of the Law Office of Bradley S. Shear, LLC has the perfect combination of expertise to make sure it is smooth sailing when communicating in the digital world. Get clear insight into the basics of what is or isn’t legal when crafting messages for use on social media platforms. In his 50-minute primer, you will learn what communicators need to know to avoid legal issues unique to social media.

To learn more about Bradley Shear’s practice you can fan him on Facebook, follow him on Twitter, or visit his firm’s Web site.

Register here to see Bradley S. Shear, ESQ speak

Time management strategies for social media activities

Steve Radick, associate for Booz Allen Hamilton, social media and government 2.0 practice

As social media continues to grow, so do the concerns about time management and measurement of tactics related to this new platform. Booz Allen Hamilton’s own social media strategist, Steve Radick, will focus on the people and processes of social media and how they truly determine the success of strategy. With a push to understand what this new technology enables, Steve will delve into his expertise on running a team of social media experts and how he best meets the needs of clients in an efficient and effective manner. Steve was recently named one of PRNews’ 15 to Watch in 2009. He was also recently named one of the expert bloggers for AIIM’s Enterprise 2.0 Community.

You can learn more about Steve and his approach to PR and social media by visiting his blog at www.steveradick.com.

Register here to see Steve Radick speak

Find out more about our Hardship Package, Smile and Save Professional Photography special and read all about our Morning Keynote, and First Breakout Sessions.

ONLY 8 Days to go until our Annual PRSA-MD Chesapeake Conference.  Register today

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To Tweet, or Not to Tweet

September 30, 2009

What can you say about Twitter? Like it or not, this still fairly-new medium has literally rocked the PR world for the past couple of years.

Stories have been broken on Twitter over ten minutes faster than its traditional counterparts. Customer service has been transformed through the use of this medium. And, since disgruntled consumers have found Twitter to be very effective in getting quick retribution for poor service, consumers are expecting much more from companies they’ve been loyal to. They no longer want to just be “marketed to”; rather, many now want to influence the conversation and have their say.

Although lots of companies have joined the conversation already, many are still on the sidelines, waiting for the right time to hop in (images of little girls waiting for the perfect time to enter when jumping rope pop into mind). However, the problem with waiting for the perfect time is that there is no perfect time. Companies who sit this one out will undoubtedly lose out!

Twitter veteran, Jeff Davis, of Sawmill Marketing Public Relations, has said that he doesn’t think today’s social media tools should replace traditional methods. Instead, he believes new media should be woven into an overall PR strategy — that ignoring social media tools such as Twitter is just as dangerous as relying exclusively on Twitter to get a message out.

Jeff will be discussing this topic and more during two workshops he will conduct on Twitter at the upcoming PRSA-Maryland Chesapeake Conference. Between the two sessions he’ll explore everything from retweets and hashtags to Twitter etiquette and what should be included in your corporate policy for social media usage.

Those who haven’t joined the conversation yet will especially benefit from his afternoon session, as he’ll be walking us through the process of signing up. Don’t forget to bring your laptops!

If you have questions or need more information, Jeff can be reached through his newly redesigned website/blog, sawmillmarketing.com.

What’s the verdict on Twitter?

September 28, 2009

So what’s the verdict on Twitter?

Is it merely a diversion for people who want to announce that they’re eating a ham sandwich in the elevator? Or do you see it as a novelty whose unproven ability to make money warrants an “endangered species” label, which keeps you from learning how to use it?

For Jeff Davis, APR, Twitter is fast becoming an essential, mainstream communications tool that enables PR practitioners to develop and maintain relationships with the media and the PR community at large.

A past president of PRSA Maryland and currently a partner with Sawmill Marketing Public Relations, Jeff will present two social media sessions at PRSA Maryland’s Chesapeake Conference. The first, beginning at 9:00 a.m., will focus on Twitter. With a down-to-earth, non-technical presentation style, he will share useful tools and techniques for Tweeting with a purpose.

Jeff’s Twitter handle is @contactjeff. You can also reach him through his new blog/website. While you’re there, be sure to check out his nationally recognized Guide to Baltimore Media on Twitter.